Wednesday, December 21, 2011

RTW: Where do you buy most of your books? No one is judging!


Road Trip Wednesday is hosted by YA Highway!

I have to confess that when I am actually buying a book I usually buy it on Amazon. The college that Susan and I go to is in the middle of the middle of a little town called Nowhere, and getting to the bookstore is quite a hike, generally through all sorts of inclement weather.

That said, I don't actually buy books very often. I am more likely to (*cringe* you said no one was judging, right?) browse a bookstore, write down a list of the books I really want to read but can't afford, and take my list to the local library. However, I don't feel too guilty because I have a mental block when it comes to returning books on time. I am fairly sure I am the library's main donor and have considered many times asking them for a plaque with my name on it.

The other way I get my books is through PaperBack Swap.
PaperBack Swap is a book trading club that allows you to send in books you don't want when other members request them, and get new books for yourself for the price of the postage of the books you sent in, which is usually about $3.00 a book. The books are used and mostly paperback, but, because of the site's "Golden Rules," they are always in an acceptable condition.

What about you? How do you usually get your books?

9 comments:

  1. The concept of Paper Back Swap sounds neat. The problem I would have with it is... I don't have any books I don't want! And I think the fact that you do what many do (i.e., go to a bookstore to find books you want to check out of the library) only shows that bookstores need to find creative ways to entice people to purchase. One way *not* to do this is to have a different pricing structure online compared to in-store *ahem b&n*. :)

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  2. There is nothing wrong with supporting your local library. As a matter of fact I should probably take advantage of what my library has to offer. But like you I know for a fact I would return the books late. I once didn't return a DVD to blockbuster for over a year. (Surprisingly enough they only charged me the minimum late fee.) So I stick to B&N, Amazon, Ebay and my local bookstore. But I will be checking out PaperBack Swap. Thanks.

    New follower :)

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  3. I'm right there with you. But I don't think I'm ashamed of Amazon shopping. Maybe I should be, but it just makes sense for my budget and habits. I love the Paperback Swap idea. I'll have to check it out!

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  4. I think it's great that you use the library. My closest local libraries are very poorly stocked, and computer stations now take up most of the real estate.

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  5. @Laurie

    The particular branch of the library that I go to is not particularly well stocked, but the district is and I can request almost anything I like from other libraries and the miraculous book delivery van will bring it in a day or two.

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  6. I read an article recently about how libraries are actually some of the main supporters of writers in many ways including financially, so don't feel guilty about checking out books. Our local library is great and there is a small branch right next to my work so I can request books online to be sent there. Lately, I have been winning books on blogs. I received 5 free books (one e-book) that way last month!

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  7. I usually order through amazon. If not, I get them through contests and offering to review them for debut authors. I really love reading and have such a long to-read list, though, that it's getting a bit out of hand. lol

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  8. Oh wow. I'd never heard of PaperBack Swap but it sounds awesome. Thanks for mentioning it! I'm going to check it out now. :)

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  9. Mostly Amazon or a random used book store.

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