Saturday, June 29, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday

Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!

Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank.
 
save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.



This week's theme is . . .
 
Well, it's Scarf-a-Scone Saturday, that's what it is. So write sentences about whatever you want and have a scone if you can possibly manage it.
 
tea scones china english

Our word is:
 
misoneism, noun
hatred of change or novelty. misoneist, n.
 
 
And our sentences are:
 
     "Why are we having muffins instead of scones?" Katie cried. "We always have scones on Saturdays!"
     "It would hardly be Saturday without the sconeses," Susan said, eyes wide in horror.
     Arena blinked in the morning light and said, "If there aren't any scones, I think I'm going back to bed."
      "Well, isn't this place just full of misoneism this morning?" Tyler-Rose said. "Luckily we have one more bag of the ginger-chai-chocolate-berry-whatsit ones."
    
     *The Suite devolves into joyful weeping*

Next week's theme is: flower pots

 
Just one more note, if you could please try to make sure that your LinkyList Link links to your Save-a-Word Saturday post and not just to your entire blog we would appreciate it. It makes it a little harder to put the words into the word horde when we have to go through your archives to find them. Thanks!

 

Wednesday, June 26, 2013

Finally

You know how I have been complaining about the beginning of my WIP since . . . I don't know . . . FEBRUARY?

And if you didn't, believe me, I have. Susan knows.

I found a bottomless abyss plot hole in the first few pages which caused the middle to go up in roaring flame which then caused the end to explode into teeny, tiny smithereens of plotlessness.


As of yesterday,


I think I finally figured it out!
 



 

 
I apologize. Ecstatic joy often makes me a trifle undignified.

Saturday, June 22, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday

NOTE:  I, SUSAN, AM CURRENTLY IN OXFORD AND WILL SOON BE BACK ON THE BLOG WITH POSTS STRAIGHT FROM ENGLAND!  (I realize this may not be exciting if you already live in England or somewhere nearby.  But for us Americans....well, I find it exciting, at least.)  

Blame the caps lock on the caffeinated Earl Grey that I had.  And now, back to....

Save-a-Word Saturday!
 
Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank.
 
save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.



This week's theme is:
porch swings
And our word is:
scripturient, adj., noun
1.  having a desire for writing or authorship
2.  one who has a passion for writing

And now for some sentences: 

         "You've been on that porch swing all day," said her brother, sticking his head out the front door.  "Don't you get sick of being in one place?" 
         "Oh, but I haven't been here all day," she said, looking up from a healthily frazzled stack of paper.  "I traveled far and wide, and would have even if you chained me to this swing.  The life of a scripturient can never be confined to one place for very long." 

Theme for next week...  Hm, it's about time we introduced you all to Scarf-a-Scone Saturday.  You thought our only alliteratively named Saturday event was Save-a-Word, but...we've been holding out on you.  Tyler-Rose and I (and our suitemates) have scones* and tea every Saturday.  Feel free to join us!  While saving some old words, of course! 

Just one more note, if you could please try to make sure that your LinkyList Link links to your Save-a-Word Saturday post and not just to your entire blog we would appreciate it. It makes it a little harder to put the words into the word horde when we have to go through your archives to find them. Thanks!


*often courtesy of Tyler-Rose's very generous grandmother


 

Saturday, June 15, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday

Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!
 
Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank.
 
save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.



This week's theme is:
travel
 
And our word is:
 
labefy, verb
to weaken
 
And our amazing, brilliant sentences...
 
"I detest travel," George said and cast himself down on one of the many comfortable little sofas spread elegantly around his library. "I find it terribly labefying."




Next week's theme will be . . . Porch Swings
 
Just one more note, if you could please try to make sure that your LinkyList Link links to your Save-a-Word Saturday post and not just to your entire blog we would appreciate it. It makes it a little harder to put the words into the word horde when we have to go through your archives to find them. Thanks!
 
 


Thursday, June 13, 2013

An Exploration of Outlining

pantser writer shoes outline
Please don't ask me. I really don't know.
I am a self-proclaimed* and happy Pantser.**

I generally start stories with one driving image, a couple of characters, and an ending. All of which I may change at my least whim. I then chug through the beginning, guided only by intuition, my fancy, and my gut. However, by page 100 I have probably discovered an angry screaming hoard of serious plot issues. And considering the vagueness of the original plan, all I can say is: duh.

Then it is time to whip out the trusty 3x5 cards!

I write the basic details of a each scene that I've written on the lined sides and lay them out in order on some open space. And since by then I generally have a much better sense of where the story is going, I do the same for the rest of the scenes in the book. Then I write scenes that I need to add on the unlined sides of the cards and insert them where they belong. This is probably enough to get me through the last page of my first draft.

From this point on I incorporate new plot ideas as if I had intended them from the beginning and note their existence in a to-do list and in BOLD, RED, CAPS-LOCKED FONT WITHIN THE TEXT OF MY DRAFT. This makes my first drafts absolutely incoherent to anyone except me. Yay.

Once I've finished with the draft, I make plans for each chapter, remove all the SCREAMING CAPS-LOCK, put all the necessary revisions into several different to-do lists so I don't lose track of them, type up all the sticky notes I've acquired into their own Word doc, and make a typed outline of the book as it stands. Then I begin revising.

But the plot keeps evolving contrary to my feeble outlines and revision plan. Usually I end up putting the draft away until it figures itself out and working on something else for a few months.

This is basically what happened to my current WIP.

Now it feels like it has worked itself out as I hoped it would. Which catapulted me into a revision frenzy and caused the beginning of the most, comprehensive, detailed, and, I hope, useful outline of how I want my book to be that I have ever written. In fact, I even titled the doc "badassoutline" in a fever of inspiration one very late night.

I am breaking the novel down by scene, titling the scene, giving a brief summary of each action, then a physical and emotional response to each action and noting the change/revelation in the scene.

But it feels very foreign, and because I have never written anything quite like this before, I had a moment of fear that I wasn't doing it right and spent some time looking up novel outlining systems on Google. Most of the ones that I found make my free-spirit cringe or were so vague it seems impossible for them to be actually helpful.

Luckily, I soon remembered that this is my creative process and it's impossible for me to do it wrong. Comforting thought.

Still, I'm curious about other peoples' outlining systems. Do you use note cards? Does your outline always have your scenes/chapter broken down in the same way or is it fluid?

I know Susan has a formidable file archive of intense, scary looking outlines. No doubt she will have an interesting response to this post as soon as she is settled in on her Awesome Adventure.***


~~~~~~~~~~


* Though I'm pretty sure Susan agrees with me.

** Which means, in case you are unfamiliar with the term, that I write by the seat of my pants. Which may or may not be permanently singed after I am done with this novel.

*** Which I am sure she will tell you about in good time.

Saturday, June 8, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday

Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!
Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank.
save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.



This week's theme is:
Hourglasses
Our word this week is:
wherefore, adv.
1.  why; for what reason
2.  as a result of which; for which reason


And our sentences...


"Wherefore must you fall, little sand?  And wherefore so fast?" I said, resting my chin on the desk so my eyes were level with the tiny device of wood and glass.  "And wherefore can I not keep up?" 


Next week's theme...travel. 


Just one more note, if you could please try to make sure that your LinkyList Link links to your Save-a-Word Saturday post and not just to your entire blog we would appreciate it. It makes it a little harder to put the words into the word horde when we have to go through your archives to find them. Thanks!

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

The Autobiography of Jane Eyre

Kiss Lizzie DarcyAs many of you are acutely aware, the much-beloved Lizzie Bennet Diaries arrived at their slightly strange but mostly inevitable conclusion a few weeks ago. As someone who spent much of the semester surviving Tuesday and Wednesday so I could achieve Thursday and surviving the rest of the week so I could achieve Monday* I have felt their lack. My life is directionless since Lizzie Bennet once again found her true love.** I am adrift.

In hopes of finding a new purpose for myself, I have watched the first few Sanditon videos. Hey, I thought, it's still Austen, it's by the same people, and it features Gigi Darcy. Purpose! YAAAAY!

I must confess, I*** found it extremely disappointing. Here I wander, still without a North Star to guide me and get me through the week.

But this story has a happy ending.

While was I puttering around YouTube in a grey haze of sorrow, loneliness, and dejection, weeping quietly to myself and eating cake, I discovered something . . . wonderful.

 


 A modernization of Jane Eyre in the style of the Lizzie Bennet Diaries.
 
 
I would even argue that it is better than the Lizzie Bennet Diaries. Blasphemy, I know, but the girl who plays Jane Eyre really is the better actress. We have yet to clearly see Rochester's face, but I am extremely hopeful.
 
They are on their tenth episode and it airs every Wednesday at 9:00 AM.
 
And you don't want to be like this guy . . .
 
darcy fun
 
So, go forth and rejoice and watch The Autobiography of Jane Eyre. 

Also, today's episode was excellent. We met Mr. Rochester. Or rather, we met his colorful socks.




 
You're welcome.




* Monday and Wednesday were the days upon which the LBD were posted.

** Even though this time, instead of marrying him, she started a company to compete with his. It's so romantic I can barely contain myself. I bet their relationship is headed for nothing but bliss.

*** and apparently most of the internet based on their STEEP drop in viewership.

Monday, June 3, 2013

What is passive voice?

First, I think we ought to ask, "What is irony?"

The answer:  not what most people think it is. 

I've heard a surprising variety of people misidentify passive voice.  Diligent college students.  Well-informed writers.  Even people authoritative enough to make me question:  "Have I studied Latin for eight years and not grasped what the passive voice is?  Does it mean something totally different in English?" 

NO.  No, it does not.  They were wrong.

So let's clear this up, once and for all...

WHAT IS PASSIVE VOICE?  

By the way, if you already are quite clear on what the passive voice is, and you have friends, family, enemies, or frienemies in your life who get this wrong, feel free to direct them here. So as not to offend them right away, just say it's a post that contains a video of Darth Vader riding a unicycle and playing the bagpipes in a kilt--which they obviously must see.


Talk about universal appeal.

ANYWAY, passive voice.

Definition of passive voice:  when the object acted upon (rather than the actor) is the subject of the sentence

Example:

Active voice:  Darth Vader played the bagpipes.
            NOTE:  Darth Vader is both the subject of the sentence and the actor of the action.

Passive voice:  The bagpipes were played by Darth Vader.
           NOTE:  Instead of the actor, Darth Vader, being the subject, the object acted upon--here the bagpipes--is the subject of the sentence.



That, and only that, constitutes passive voice.  You can talk about semi-passives and passive participles, but that's not actually, necessarily passive voice.  Check out UNC Chapel Hill's explanation if you don't believe me.   They provide numerous other examples.

And now, I will leave you and Darth Vader to go on your merry way. 



Saturday, June 1, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday and a Book Release

 
by the excellent Danielle E. Shipley was released yesterday!
 
 
Congratulations, Danielle!!!!
 
I just bought my copy and I'm so very, very excited.
So very, very, very, very excited.

 
Now, onwards to saving words.
 
Despite our recent lack of posting, we still want to spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving these precious, wonderful, whirling words from the dusty, lonely corners of the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank. 
 

save-a-word-saturdayThe rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Use as many of the words as you can on the people in your life. Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.



This week's theme is:
Tea
 
And we know it's not old, but believe me, this is the word of the week:
 
resistentialism, noun
The theory that inanimate objects demonstrate hostile behavior toward us.
 
THEY DO!!!! I KNOW THEY DO!! 
 
Moving on.
 
Our sentences are:
 
     "Dangblasted gosh darned frickin frackin frickin frack," Jane cried. "That thrice blasted corner jumps out at me! I swear it does. It's trying to bite me." She sank to the floor cradling her aching arm.  "I don't know what I ever did to make it hate me so much."
     "Resistentialism," Mary said.
     "What?" Jane looked up and knocked her head against the wall behind her with an echoing thud.
     "Resistentialism," Mary repeated. "The philosophy that inanimate things are out to get us. The only cure is tea and deep breathing."
 
Next week's theme is: hourglasses
 
Just one more note, if you could please try to make sure that your LinkyList Link links to your Save-a-Word Saturday post and not just to your entire blog we would appreciate it. It makes it a little harder to put the words into the word horde when we have to go through your archives to find them. Thanks!