Saturday, August 31, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday


Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!
Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank
.
save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.


This week's theme is: Dungeons. 


Our word is an old one that was apparently last used in 1875...

darkful, adj. (which means....prepare to be SHOCKED...)  

full of darkness. 

Aaaand our slightly-less-obvious sentences are:

Susan knew walking straight into The Castle of Otranto wouldn't be all sunshine and butterflies.  But she hadn't expected the dungeons to be quite as dank, deep, and darkful as they were...  They were dull, too.  There's not much to do in dungeons, it turns out. 

And next week's theme is: maps.

Saturday, August 24, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday and an Announcement

Sadly, this is weekend when our summer officially ends, when we return to slavery--I mean, to college and to our various responsibilities and commitments. 

The positive side of this is that Susan and I will once again live in the same time zone and can plan excellent blog things for your amusement and edification.

Classes don't resume 'till Wednesday, but the next few days will be so full of packing and flying and moving and sad farewells and happy reunions that I don't think we will have time to write anything until after we are all settled later in the week.

Once we've got our lives organized and sorted and our 35-gallon bins emptied*--sometime around next Saturday--we will be unveiling a new header and button for our blog as well as some other wonderful things. So, get excited!

Meanwhile, here's a cute British vlogger dressed as a t-rex trying to catch Krave cereal that is being launched at him out of a slingshot.

 
You're welcome.

Now let's save some words!


Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!

Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank
.
save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.


This week's theme is: Love. 

How lovely.

The word which we are so bravely saving this week is:

 papilionaceous, adj.
shaped like a butterfly.

Our sentences are:

     John fell to the ground and held the glittering emerald up to his dear Lucinda. "Dear Lucinda," said he, "I offer you this precious and papilionaceous stone as as a token of my undying affection. I chose this stone because it was almost as bright as your eyes. Be gentle with it, it is my heart."
     A smile spread slowly across Lucinda's red lips. She pushed her wire rimmed glasses up her nose and ran a hand through her tumbling brown curls. "I love it when you use words like 'papilionaceous.' It's so . . . so . . ."  A delicate shiver ran across her skin. "Come here, Tiger," she said.

And next week's theme is: dungeons. 
  
* When we move, most of us pack our stuff into 35-gallon# plastic bins. For some reason, it is absolutely impossible to buy moving boxes in our college town. And moving boxes are too squishable anyway. You can't stack them five high and they don't nest nearly as well.

# Can I just say how much I hate knowing exactly how many gallons of stuff I own? I own approximately 120 gallons of stuff. Total&. That's not a lot. I hate having all my lovely things reduced to The-95-Gallons-of-Stuff-I-Have-To-Pack. It's dehumanizing somehow.

& Not including the books. Duh. 
  

Saturday, August 17, 2013

Save-A-Word Saturday

Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!

Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank
.
save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.


This week's theme is: lamp shades. 

Our word is:

botheration
1.  noun, effort, worry, or difficulty
2.  exclamation, used to express mild irritation or annoyance

And our sentences are (pretty much a direct quote from my life, minus this word)...

She sat propped up on three fluffy pillows, reading a book by the light of her bedside lamp.  Just as she was turning a page, she sneezed. Her ponytail brushed against the lamp shade, causing the oversensitive thing to wobble and go out.  "Botheration!" she said to the darkness, fiddling with painfully overheated switch that was supposed to turn it back on. 

Next week's theme is:  love. 

Friday, August 16, 2013

Follow Friday and Lyric-less Writing Music

Welcome to Feature and Follow Friday, hosted by Parajunkee and Alison Can ReadCheck it out HERE and join in!  Basically you just follow the two hosts and the two features, and follow back anyone who follows you.

This week's features are (love this name!) No Bent Spines and Thoughts and Pens




This week's question:  Share something you've learned about book blogging or just blogging in general in the last month.  

Umm, well.  Tyler-Rose recently showed me how to add search descriptions to our post, so if it shows up in someone's search they can see a helpful explanation instead of a random sample of the blog post text.  I also learned (once again) how wonderfully talented Tyler-Rose is when she showed me the gorgeous new (and as-yet-unveiled) header and button she designed for us!  Come to think of it, Tyler-Rose would probably have been the better one to answer this question... 

Happy Friday! 



Also--after yesterday's post, I was reminded that some people can't write to music with lyrics.  So even though I KNOW this isn't new to her, here's the 2010 Robin Hood soundtrack.  Excellent stuff.  For writing, or any other time you need a great soundtrack. :)


Thursday, August 15, 2013

Music for Writing

It's nearly moving-back-to-college time (where these blog partners shall be reunited!  Huzzah!), and Tyler-Rose and I are cramming in a LOT of revising/re-envisioning into these last days of summer... 

So I thought I'd share a great writing song I came across recently.  Seriously--it's PERFECT for writing.  Especially if you're having trouble getting something down on the page. 


The whole album, in fact, is about getting reconnected with art that you've left alone for a while or become disillusioned with.  Or, as the wonderful Missy herself says in this interview:

Missy Higgins hat[This album is]...kind of a diary about my experience over the past few years about where I’ve been emotionally with trying to find my love again of music, trying to find inspiration again. I kind of got burnt out with music a little bit, and I thought I would quit music forever. I kind of had an existential crisis and wanted to find out who I was without music in my life. There are a lot of songs that try and reconcile the performance and the entertainment side of my personality with the personal.  (The Daily Nebraskan, 12 Sept. 2012)




Happy writing, reading, and listening!  And watch out for those existential crises. ;) 

Monday, August 12, 2013

Book Review: Someday My Prince Will Come


I thought this book looked funny and maybe a little bit awesome, but it's really just . . . another whiny memoir.

And now I have a library fine because I managed to forget about its existence so successfully.

*sigh*










Saturday, August 10, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday

Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!

Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank.
save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.


This week's theme is: sharks. 

Our word is:

malaise, noun 
 uneasiness; indefinable feeling of illness or discomfort

Our sentences are:

     "Come on in, Melinda. The water's fine!" Jerry called over his shoulder. He was already knee deep in the icy water.
     Melinda hovered nervously on the shore. "Is it cold?"
     "Just enough to be very bracing. Come on, you can do it. It's just the thing to cure this malaise you've been suffering from all week."
     "Are there sharks?"
     Jerry let out a bark of laughter, almost lost his footing, but caught himself before he could go tumbling over the sharp rocks on their right. "Melinda," Jerry said, "this is a mountain river. No, there are no sharks."
     "No need to sound so amused," Melinda said. "I was just checking."

Next week's theme is: lamp shades.

Friday, August 9, 2013

The Stone Kingdom: Cover Reveal

Back in April we did a cover reveal for The Swan Prince by Danielle E. Shipley of Ever On Word.  Today, we have the great honor to reveal the cover for the second book of the wonderful and charming Wilderhark Tales.

Without further ado, we bring you . . .

 
Love and prince,
Both true, wed rose of white in realm of stone;
For blood begins,
But naught can be put right by blood alone.”
 
One thoughtless act is all it takes to bring the curse threatened
on Rosalba’s christening day to pass. Now the princess must combine
her desperate determination with the service of benevolent tailor Edgwyn Wyle
to find the second half of the key to her kingdom’s restoration.
 
The Stone Kingdom
Book Two of The Wilderhark Tales
 
<> ~ <> ~<>
 
An enchantress’s curse turns a spoiled royal into a beast;
A princess’s pricked finger places her under a hundred-year spell;
Bales of straw are spun as golden as the singing harp whisked down a giant beanstalk –
All within sight of Wilderhark, the forest that’s seen it all.
 
You’ve heard the stories –
of young men scaling rope-like braids to assist
the tower-bound damsel; of gorgeous gowns
appearing just in time for a midnight ball;
of frog princes, and swan princes,
and princes saved from drowning by maidens of the sea.
 
Tales of magic. Tales of adventure. Most of all, tales of true love.
 
Once upon a time, you knew them as fairytales.
Know them now as Wilderhark’s.
 
 
It will be available on September 20th on both Amazon and Barns and Noble online. But if, like me, you can't wait, you can add it to your Goodreads Want to Read list right now.
 
Congratulations, Danielle!
 
About the Author:
 
Danielle E. Shipley’s first novelettes told the everyday misadventures of wacky kids like herself. …Or so she thought. Unbeknownst to them all, half of her characters were actually closeted elves, dwarves, fairies, or some combination thereof. When it all came to light, Danielle did the sensible thing: Packed up and moved to Fantasy Land, where daily rent is the low, low price of her heart, soul, blood, sweat, tears, firstborn child, sanity, and words; lots of them. She’s also been known to spend short bursts of time in the real-life Chicago area with the parents who home schooled her and the two little sisters who keep her humble. When she’s not living the highs and lows of writing young adult novels, she’s probably blogging about it at www.EverOnWord.wordpress.com.



Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Why I am a Plotter (I think)

Harry Potter plotter
Ahaha.

I am a firm believer in having a vision of what you want to produce before you create something.  The goal, the destination, I find necessary.

The level of detail in said vision varies, and that may be one way of describing the difference between so-called plotters and pantsers.  Pansters must (I assume) go into a draft with a vision for what they want to create--it's just much less detailed than the vision/plan a plotter would start with.

I think there's more to it than the level of detail in pre-writing, however.

I've heard pantsers talk about the first draft as a "journey of discovery."  For me, writing a draft is much more a journey with a fixed destination--a point on the horizon that, however complex it may be and however twisty the road may get and however much I may not be aiming for exactly the right place yet, I am headed towards.  And that destination is much more than a word count or the satisfaction of typing "The End."  It's the combined effect of many specific stops along the way.

Bilbo Hobbit beginning
What's that knocking?  Why, it's a barrage of Hobbit pictures and comparisons.

This is in part because the haphazardness that journeys of discovery entail scares the crap out of me.  I am not a spontaneous person.  (Ask my friends who try to get me to go out without planning it days beforehand.)  So while such experimentation is necessary, I find it too overwhelming to do that AND be master of myself enough to put words on the page at the same time.

Bilbo Hobbit Dwarves
If you really NEEDED me to go somewhere on short notice, it would probably look a lot like this.

And now that Bilbo Baggins has invaded my post...  More importantly, perhaps: when I'm actually drafting, I feel the need to know where I'm going.  Bilbo, as you may have noticed, has little idea where he's going or what he's signed up for when he runs off on his Unexpected Journey.  

Bilbo Hobbit running
"In control" is not exactly the phrase that comes to mind.

And--thank you, Bilbo, you're perfect--Bilbo does write his story down.  But he does it after he's experienced the wide-eyed discovery of the unexpected.

This isn't a perfect analogy, of course--no matter how detailed my plan is, drafting is still an exciting journey with unforseeable twists and turns. It's just that I find it very important to have a destination fixed firmly in mind before I depart.  This is especially true when we're talking about revisions. 

Lonely Mountain roadtrip
Behold!  I sighted the Lonely Mountain on a family car trip!

~~This blog post brought to you by the frustration I am experiencing because I am STILL outlining.  I want to just open that document and WRITE.  But if I did that now, I would flounder and flail and get overwhelmed and nothing much would get done.

Overwhelmed IS the word...

So, back to the outline I go!

Saturday, August 3, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday

Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!

Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank.
save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.


This week's theme is: violins.

And before we start, can I just say--WAHHHHH I MISS MY FREE OED SUBSCRIPTION.  Whether it's from my home college or Oxford itself, constant online OED access is very nice.  Especially when you unearth an old word every(other) Saturday....

Our word--not checked with the OED this week, unfortunately--is:

dint, noun
a blow struck with a sword or other weapon; also a hollow or impression created on a surface

And I would like to quote the article where I found this:--12 Old Words that Survivied by Getting Fossilized in Idioms:

        "Dint" comes from the oldest of Old English where it originally referred to a blow struck with a sword or other weapon. It came to stand for the whole idea of subduing by force, and is now fossilized in our expression "by dint of X" where X can stand for your charisma, hard work, smarts, or anything you can use to accomplish something else.  

You know when someone says something and it's so cool that you just sit there and go, "Yeah, I NEED to add that to my speech patterns." ?  Tyler-Rose does this to me sometimes--hence our sentences:

        Raining down spit on the first few rows, the conductor roared, "And you bet your battlements--!" 
        The first violinist stood up and hit him over the head with a music stand.  "I'm sorry," he said to the orchestra.  "Just one of those days, you know?"  He eyed the edge of the stage where the conductor lay toppled.  "I don't think it's a deadly dint, in any case." 

Next week's theme:  Sharks


Friday, August 2, 2013

Character Chart

cloud thunder rain lightening

Now that it's August--and our return to school looms like a thunder cloud on the horizon*--Susan and I are getting very serious about our summer revising/rewriting goals. The End is nigh and time is running short. We've even been doing Write Club-like sprints to keep each other focused.**

As I usually do when I'm doing anything except drafting, I spend some of my time looking for charts/advice/secrets/keys to the writing universe. I find them reassuring and sometimes they even turn out to be helpful.

Today I found this exhaustive Character Chart that goes through everything from personal appearance to how your character feel about his job and his mother. It looks really, really fun.

I know what I'm doing with the rest of my morning.

Also . . .

Susan and I are mighty warriors and will defeat any plot problems or character inconsistencies 
that stand in our path to glory.

armor woman sword badass
Be inconsistent, MC. I dare you.


archers hunting robin hood
Be wery, wery quite. We're hunting plot holes.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* Shudder.

** Some mornings it works better than others. The first day I was really productive, but the day after that all I could do was blink blearily at my bright shiny computer screen and check my Facebook every six seconds. Even with a huge cup of very black black tea my powers of concentration only improved minimally. We shall persist, however. The body can adapt. It just hurts.