Thursday, October 31, 2013

Quoth the raven, 'Nevermore.'

First let me say . . .



Bwa ha ha ha ha!!! 

Now, onwards!

In honor of one of my favorite festivals* I'm going to share something fabulously charming which I discovered recently.

As you may know, I loved the Lizzie Bennet Diaries ** and started watching The Autobiography of Jane Eyre after Sanditon proved disappointing.*** I was looking forward with excitement to the release of the Emma Approved vlog from the same people who made the LBD, but . . .

Now, I don't mean to cast aspersions on anyone's favorite fandom, but . . . I thought Emma Approved was wretched and got through about a video and a half before I gave it up forever. I DARE you to tell me it gets better and that I didn't give it enough of a chance. I am an immovable pillar of displeasure on this issue.

But I love vlog-style retellings and since I have the gaping void of EMMA APPROVED SUCKS in my life, I've been on the lookout for other stories that I can infuse into my week one three minute segment at a time.

The gods smiled and I discovered  



In which the struggling Poe-et, Ed Poe, vlogs about the writing life and his WIP while the ghostly Lenore (one of her ghost friends set them up) haunts his study.^

It's awkwardly charming and oh, so applicable to my life. I usually just want to give Poe a hug and tell him that writing fails are universal and all writers have them. Just not always as epic-ly as him.

And not to believe the mean things Lenore says. She just doesn't understand. *weep* Except about the hearts in the floor. I'm with her on that. He needs to get rid of those. Immediately. And maybe get a puppy.

 He finished "The Raven" the other day, so if you want to be seasonally appropriate go watch them all RIGHT NOW.

 Happy Halloween!

I wish you enough candy to fuel a week-long writing marathon. In my honor, of course. Since it's my birthday week, after all.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


* My birthday is Nov 2nd. Halloween and my birthday are inextricably linked in my mind. I start celebrating as soon as the first excruciatingly frightening scarecrow# goes up.

# I think the one outside our local preschool is the scariest I've ever seen. And I've had ample time to stare at it in terror because I wait for a carpool there every week. It's one of those loose, plumply straw-stuffed ones that you sort of lay on something. It probably originally had a standard-issue jack-'o-lantern head, but it must have been stolen or fallen off or something because someone has replaced it with a tiny baby doll head. It is the most frickin' scary thing I've ever seen.+

+ This scarecrow is also especially scary because as I come around the corner it looks like a person passed out on the sidewalk. I always experience about a second where I'm convinced it's one of the guys who is supposed to be in the carpool with me and he's collapsed into some sort of (possibly drunken) stupor.

** Except for the ending. How could they think Lizzie setting up a company to compete with Darcy's counted as a happy ending? HOW? And don't get me started on Bing being reduced to arm-candy . . .

*** and continued disappointing to the bitter end.

^It seemed somehow appropriate to share this with you on this Day of Days. *cue evil laughter*

Wednesday, October 30, 2013

What's up Wednesday (our first ever!)

*peeks over her laptop screen*  Hello?  Can I come in? 

This is my first time doing What's Up Wednesday.  Basically ever since I saw that Jaime and Erin were starting a weekly meme together, I wanted to join.  But somehow it didn't happen until now...so here goes! 

Hosted by the lovely sisters Jaime Morrow and Erin L. Funk, What's Up Wednesday is a weekly meme/blog hop in which writer-bloggers take a brief post to share what's going on in their lives, writing-related and otherwise.  Check it out here or here if you want the details! 



WHAT I'M READING

Villette by Charlotte Bronte.  So far it has been...super-weird, to be honest.  In the coolest, Charlotte Bronte-esque way, of course.  But don't expect Jane Eyre if you pick it up. 

I'm also nearing the end of Throne of Glass--need to set aside some time to finish that soon. :)


WHAT I'M WRITING

Working on a comprehensive rewrite of THE MADMAN'S CROWN and have finally started transitioning back into the drafting stage.  (Before I was spending most of my time going through exercises from Donald Maass's Writing 21st Century Fiction.)


WHAT INSPIRES ME RIGHT NOW

This song...


Also this song...  


Um...yeah.  They totally go well together...


WHAT ELSE I'VE BEEN UP TO

I'm going to pull a partner-blogger moment and talk about Tyler-Rose instead of me here.  She's in a graphic design class, and has been making us some new personalized buttons which I should (?) finally get to see today!  They should be featured on our About Us page eventually.  I'm very excited. :) 

Oh--maybe I will talk about me a bit.  I've been trying to decide lately whether or not I should make caffeine a part of my life.  I'm not a coffee or caffeinated tea drinker....yet....  I could really use it, but I'm pretty sensitive to it and sometimes it makes me anxious.  I will probably just continue fighting sleep deprivation with sheer will power.  -_-


Well that wasn't so hard.  :)  Looking forward to meeting you all!  Happy Wednesday!

Saturday, October 26, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday

Exciting side note, I'm blogging from Susan's house tonight. We've finally arrived--praise the Lord!--at Fall Break and my kind, kind blog partner invited all our roommates and I to her lovely home for the long weekend.

We have spent the little time we have when we aren't doing homework making up for lost time as good consumers. In other words, many malls and shops have been visited. I must say, I LOVE seeing my clothes before I buy them. Internet shopping is just a sad, sad lottery which depressed students trapped in rural Midwestern towns are forced to endure.

Now, onwards to saving words!

Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!
  
Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank.

save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.

This week's theme is:  wallpaper removal.


Our word:

vetanda, pl. noun
forbidden things

And our sentences . . .

Elizabeth knelt in the corner of the room where the wallpaper was beginning to peel up from the baseboard. It seemed almost as if . . . as if there was something written there. Elizabeth reached down and peeled the edge of the crumbling paper away from the plaster to reveal what vetanda lay beneath.
 

Next week's theme is . . . journeys.

Saturday, October 19, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday & Blog Birthday!

Guest Post by Katie the Roomate

Dear Writerly Folk of Blogland,

Where were you at 3:11 P.M. on Tuesday the Eighteenth of October, Two Thousand Eleven?

Perhaps you were enjoying a cup of afternoon tea as you worked on your latest novel draft or scrolled through your blogroll. Perhaps you were procuring groceries for a deceased astronaut's funeral luncheon or herding a flock of zebras through the Scottish highlands. Perhaps you were ironing your favourite* pair of argyle socks or painting your cat's toenails a lovely shade of chartreuse**. Yes, I think that's it--I can sense it. Though the mists of time veil you from my sight, your cat's chartreuse toenails gleam through the murk.

Regardless of the state of your cat's toenails in the autumn of that shining year, I can say with certainty what you were not doing at that auspicious three o'clock hour. You were not swooning over sharply dressed men. You were not marveling at the universe's most incredible gift to man: the fainting goat. Nor were you learning how to make fourteenth-century salmon and fruit pie, nor how to create the healthiest dessert in the world, nor how to properly cook bacon. (If you knew the words whisternefet or rusticate or misoneism on October 18, 2011, we need to talk, because you must be the coolest person in the world, or at least someone with the ability to get me a free subscription to the OED online.) You were doing and knowing none of these things, for this most glorious and awe-ful blog had yet to be born.

As for me, humble and lowly Katie the Roommate, I was sitting just a wall of cinderblocks away from the birthplace of the very blog you now hold in your hands. Was I cognizant of this remarkable fact? Regrettably, no. Ten feet away from me two brave young women were unleashing The Feather and the Rose to the world. I sat clipping my toenails*** while they prepared to share with you their wisdom, daring, and wit.

And wise and daring and witty they are. Where else in the world are you going to find people who can bring their knowledge of not only Greek vocabulary and Aristotle but also Russell Crowe's voice and Dove Chocolates to bear on the art of writing? Nowhere else that I know of. And they manage all this glory whilst battling mountains of homework the size of Olympus. They're pretty incredible people. Relish them.

So a happiest of happy second birthdays to The Feather and the Rose! And to Tyler-Rose and Susan!**** Although they're older than two years old! Or are they . . . ?

 I'd powder-sugar their faces onto cakes and share them***** with you all if I could.

Yours in the newfound knowledge of chartreuse,

Katie the Roommate

 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

* I cannot and will not apologise for my Anglophilic tendencies, which are immensely powerful despite the fact that I have but once journeyed beyond the North American continent.

** Do you actually know what colour chartreuse is? I do not. I just know that it is the name of a colour that everyone uses when they discuss the colour-blindness of males. Shall we find out together? Let's! Wikipedia tells me it's green! Yellow-y green! Always remember, never forget!

*** This is a lie. I only ever clip my toenails on Sunday mornings, at either 7:26 A.M. or 9:41 A.M.

**** Have you ever wondered which one's the Feather and which one's the Rose? I mean, Tyler-Rose's name makes it sort of obvious, but who knows? They could be getting deeply metaphorical on us. For my part, I'm envisioning them in mascot costumes, like this:

The very definition of beauty.

Sorry, Susan. This was the only feather-y mascot I could find.

***** Ambiguous antecedent! Am I sharing the cakes, or am I sharing Susan and Tyler-Rose? I'm having trouble deciding which one I'd prefer myself . . . . But they make me cake, so I guess I'll keep them. You can have their powdered-sugar faces.

As a blog birthday gift to Tyler-Rose and Susan, I let them go to bed early while I took over Save-a-Word Saturday. So let's have at it!


Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!
 
Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank.

save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.

This week's theme: chandeliers.

My word:

neshly, adv.
softly, silently; gently

And my sentences:

Katie the Roommate sat in the late-night living room, her roommates having gone to sleep long ago, when the sound of someone knocking neshly on the door disturbed her blogging reverie.

"Who is that, knocking so neshly at the door?" she asked herself. She took a brief glance through the peephole to find-- but no! How could it be?"

Puzzled, she opened the door to correct her wearied eyesight. But there he was indeed! Richard Armitage stood on the doorstep, clutching two tattered manuscripts to his chest, his arms quivering and eyes flashing with frenzy.

"Susan and Tyler-Rose! Where are Susan and Tyler-Rose?!"

"They-- they've gone to sleep for the night, Mr. Armitage. What are you doing here?"

"I must speak with them!" His mad voice thundered through the empty hallway and the papers in his arms fluttered with his zeal.

Then, conspiratorially, he leaned toward Katie the Roommate to whisper, "I have given up my life as an actor to pursue a career as a literary agent. I found The Feather and the Rose the day it was born, October 18th, 2011, and I have visited it every day since. How Susan and Tyler-Rose inspired me then! But it was only last week that I built up the courage to fly to America, break into their dorm, and steal their WIPs from their laptops. Now I want to publish their novels as my debut into the publishing world. I can think of nothing more fitting than to kickstart the careers of the young women who changed my life. Please, please allow me to speak with them!"

"Oh, Mr. Armitage, what a remarkable story! I'm sure they'd both be most honoured, and I'll be sure to pass along your compliment. But they've both had a long week of papers and midterms, and so much more work to do this weekend. I know they wouldn't want to be disturbed from their slumber."

The actor-turned-agent let out a hiss and then turned sharply, stomping his way down the long hallway.

And with that dear Richard vanished into the night, never to be seen again.  But at times, Susan and Tyler-Rose and their roommates yet hear a strange moaning, as if from a dying bird, beneath the windows of their dorm, and they watch as the grieving agent lets his beloved manuscripts depart, page by page, into the ether.


Next week's theme is . . . wallpaper removal.
 

Thursday, October 17, 2013

Tarte de Brymlent, c1300

Since today is fairly nasty and grey and cold* we're going to talk about something I did over the summer when it was lovely and warm.

Sometime during August I was doing research** for my WIP regarding cooking meat over an open fire. Specifically bacon. There is an important scene that involves some lovely bacon cooked over a wonderful open fire and given to my heroine.

Incidentally, and in case someone else is suffering from the same question, what I discovered was that you need a little cooking-stand thing with a flat top to put over your open fire that you can set your frying pan on.

Tada!

Anyway, during my search I discovered Gode Cookery,*** a website dedicated to spreading knowledge about Medieval cooking. They explicate important techniques, inform you what food people in the Middle Ages would most definitely not have had, and provide recipes in their original Middle English as well as translated into Modern English. I discovered that, because we had read several texts in their original ME in Medieval Lit., I could make out a lot of the recipes.

Needless to say I was struck with the absolute necessity of cooking something from the website for my family. As old followers may know, I love pies. I love to cook pies. I love to eat pies. My family loves to eat the pies I cook for them. It follows naturally that the recipe I would pick would be Tarte de Brymlent.

Salmon and fruit pie.

Let me pause for a second to say that I don't know what was wrong with me. For some inexplicable reason, second thoughts didn't strike until I was actually about to taste the pie and I suddenly realized that I was going to put stewed salmon and fruit simultaneously in my mouth, but whatever. Moving on.

Here is the original+ recipe:

175. Tart de brymlent. Take fyges & raysouns, & waisshe hem in wyne, and grinde hem smale with apples & peres clene ypiked. Take hem vp and cast hem in a pot wiþ wyne and sugur. Take calwer samoun ysode, oþer codlyng oþer haddok, & bray hem smal, & do þerto white powdours & hoole spices & salt, & seeþ it. And whanne it is sode ynowgh, take it vp and do it in a vessel, and lat it kele. Make a ciffyn an ynche depe & do þe fars þerin. Plaunt it above with prunes damysyns: take þe stones out; and wiþ dates quartered and piked clene. And couere the coffyn, and bake it wel, and serue it forth.

If you aren't bothering to try to read that, the pie contains: boiled salmon, wine, figs, raisins, apples, pears, sugar, white pepper, whole spices (I used the 'cinnamon, ginger, cloves, peppercorns' combination recommended in the translation), dates, and prunes.

I learned to skin salmon for this recipe, guys.

All the various fruits after an eternity of chopping.

My well-skinned salmon fillets. I kept all my fingers.


The spice sachet and salmon about to be boiled in wine.

. . . After much boiling.

Finished product.

And the inside of the finished product.


And there you have a salmon pie a la the Fourteenth Century. I was able to get my family to try it even after I told them what was in it. They have such faith in me.

No doubt you're dying to know what this bizarre concoction tasted like.

Tyler-Rose's flavor analysis:

It tasted salty and sweet and weirdly of Christmas (Thank you, whole spices). However, the texture was unattractively grainy, due mostly, I think, to the salmon and the figs. It wasn't repulsive, exactly, but it wasn't really something I wanted another piece of either++. My pie-crust was good enough I sort of wished I could scrape the salmon out and fill it with something else more desert-like and less mind-bending.

And thus was my writerly curiosity successfully assuaged.


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


* The doughnut and cup of hot cider I just had are helping, but the lovely warm glow is wearing off quickly. I'm down in Purgatory^ and our college keeps the library at nearly arctic temperatures. The only reason inside is better than outside is that, if you manage not to sit under a vent, you can be reasonably sure of the absence of frigid wind. Are they trying to preserve the books? Trying to save money?^^ Trying to kill us all by a slow, creeping, hypothermia? We don't know.

^ Our library is divided into the levels of Dante's Divide Comedy. We are a school of literature nerds. Even the math majors know what we're talking about. Here's a link to an earlier post in which I describe this further.

^^ It's not this one because it is just as fricking cold here in the summer when it's blazingly hot and sticky outside.

** I like to try and stay as accurate as I can despite the fantastical elements in my work. If guns and broadswords didn't coexist^, I don't want them together in my novel. Never mind the fact that the roads lay flat because of magic. That's not what we're discussing here.

^ Except they did. YAY!

*** An excellent resource for anyone looking to go a little Medieval on their manuscript. Or who just want to cook something kinda weird that your ancestors might have eaten. That is also perfectly legit.

+ If you desire a translation so you too can trick your family into eating salmon pie, you can find it here.

++ No doubt I would have felt differently about this if I were a protein-starved soul in the 1300s.

Saturday, October 12, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday

Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!
  
Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank.

save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.


OMG IT'S A BABY SQUIRREL CUTEST THING EVER.


This week's theme is:  fall leaves.  


Our word:

victless, adj.
lacking food; hungry; starved


And our sentences, which may or may not be based upon real life: 

        "Look at the poor, victless squirrels," said Tyler-Rose, watching the animals take flying leaps at a bird feeder covered in fall leaves.
        "They're not starving; look how fat they are.  Also, I think I just spoke a semicolon."  Susan peered out the window, watching brown leaves fall like dry words composed late on a Friday.  "Even if this were the conversation we had in reality once, and it was winter, they would still probably be doing alright." 

~

And that, my friends, is, I fear, the worst thing that has ever been done with the autumn leaves metaphor.  Please see Homer, Vergil, Dante, and Milton for some considerably more profound instances of its use. 

Next week's theme is . . . chandeliers

Saturday, October 5, 2013

Save-a-Word Saturday

Welcome to Save-a-Word Saturday!
  
Join us as we spread our love of old and unusual words by sharing them with other bloggers and thereby saving them from the oldest, least-visited vaults of the Word Bank.

save-a-word-saturday
<a href="http://www.thefeatherandtherose.blogspot.com" target="_self"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-7UO138NOoX4/UItIxhKJwmI/AAAAAAAAArM/LBMYc_tVWdk/s800/sawmeme.jpg" alt="Save-a-Word Saturday" width="251" height="251" /></a>


The rules run thusly:

1. Create a lovely blog post that links back to this one. The easiest way to do that would be to grab the code under our pretty Save-a-Word Saturday button. Just copy and paste it into the HTML part of your blog.

2. Pick an old word you want to save from extinction to feature in your blog post. It really must be an old word, not just a big one. We are trying to save lovely archaisms, not ugly giants (for example, "Dihydrogen Monoxide" is not an acceptable choice). Luciferous Logolepsy is a great database of lovely words if you're having trouble coming up with something on your own.

3. Provide a definition of your word. Use your word in a sentence (or even a short paragraph) vaguely related to the theme we have chosen this week. You may also add visual or musical interpretations of your word or your sentence. In fact, add anything that moves your creative spirit.

4. Add your post to the linky list below (it's down there somewhere). Then hop to as many other blogs as you can in search of as many wonderful words as possible!

5. Be a hero by using the words in your everyday life--that is how they will really be saved!  Do leave us a note or add something to your own post to let us all know what wonderful old word you whipped out to befuddle your friends and relations.


This week's theme is:  bacon.  

Because . . . yeah.

Anyway, our word this week is:

revolute, adj.
rolled back, especially at the edges.

and our sentences are: 

"I see the swine is looking wonderfully revolute this morning," Jenny said with a smile.
     Anne gave her a black look and took another gulp of her strong coffee. "Shut up," she snarled. "Make another sound before I finish this cup of coffee and I swear to God you'll be wearing your 'revolute swine' instead of eating it."

Next week's theme is . . . fall leaves
 

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Brutally Honest Reviewers

Whether I would ever say this again after becoming a published author, I don't know.

But, for now at least:  HURRAY FOR BAD, AWFUL, HARSH REVIEWS.  (<--Sincere.) 



Why?  They do great things for me, as a writer and a reader. 

1.  As a reader:  If no one ever got up and ranted about a book, the community of book-lovers would sort of have no standards. 

2.  As a reader:  It's also just plain helpful to know if a book might not be worth your time.  For subjectivity reasons, it's good to try books anyway, of course.  But maybe you'll check it out of a library first.

3.  As a writer:  First, I have to say, as someone aspiring to published authorhood, they scare the crap out of me.  So in that way they're probably a great reality check--even if I get published, it is guaranteed that someone is going to HATE my book.  (Eeek!) 


4.  As a human being:  Especially if it's a very popular book or a book I loved, it's kind of exciting to see someone be really displeased with it.  It forces me to question my opinions and think a lot about things.

5.  As a writer:  I really enjoy this one--you can learn A LOT from reviews of any kind as a writer.  But with a bad review (keeping in mind that this is just one person, of course), the learning experience increases, and can sometimes get a lot more specific than good reviews.  These are the reviews that tell you what NOT to do, in terms that are hopefully more explicit and forceful than anything a CP or beta would use with you.

(Sorry reader-friends, these are mostly writer-focused from here on out.) 

6.  As a writer (and reader I guess):  Sort of a restatement of point 3, but especially if you liked the book they're ranting about, it proves to you just how subjective a thing love for stories can be. 

7.  As a writer:  Maybe this is just wishful thinking, but always I feel like seeing this happen to other people's books helps me develop my thick skin somehow.  NOT saying I would want to go around and read my own reviews.  That still sounds like a very bad idea. 

8.  As a writer:  It makes you see flaws in your own work that it would have been hard for you to acknowledge any other way.  "Oh, that's a good point.  Ohhhhh.  I do that too." 

9.  As a writer:  It makes you feel good about yourself.  "Look!  I didn't do that in my manuscript.  Yay me!" 

~

What's your stance on bad reviews?  If you've seen a particularly scathing one lately, please share it with me here or on Twitter--seriously, I need more of these in my life!

If you write them regularly/freely, DEFINITELY give me a link to your blog below or tweet it at me!  I would love to stop by and check it out! 

And now that I've written this.... *looks fearfully into the future, and vows never to read her own reviews unless vetted by a caring friend*

Post inspired by:  This *seriously harsh* vlog review of Fallen.